The brass curtain rod that was once the holy grail of film restoration

The brass curtain rod that was once the holy grail of film restoration

The last thing you want to see in your lifetime is a film that isn’t 100% of its former glory.

That’s why it’s so important to make sure your restoration is as pristine as possible, says cinematographer Mark Bowers, who is working on a restoration of The King’s Speech for the BBC.

“It’s not an easy thing to do because there’s no such thing as perfect restoration,” he says.

“But I think it’s important for a lot of the things that you want restoration to be.”

The key to a really great restoration is the ability to get the original footage in the film, so if you can get that to be 100% in the final film, you’ll have a lot more fun.

“Bowers spent a lot time on The King and, after his team worked on the film for years, realised the film needed some sort of visual correction.”

For the project, the film was shot in the same colour space as the original film.””

So we came up with the idea of using the film as a blank slate and using the footage that had been shot, and adding colour.”

For the project, the film was shot in the same colour space as the original film.

“There were all these little black-and-white shots, and we added a colourised version of them,” Bowers explains.

“When we were doing the restoration, we did a little bit of colour correcting of those little black and white shots to make them look a bit more like the film.

And it’s also important to note that we’re not trying to make a film from scratch, we’re just doing a digital restoration.

It’s a big film and a very difficult film to do. “

It’s a very tricky thing to work with.

It’s a big film and a very difficult film to do.

Bower has been restoring the film since the 1980s, but his team were first inspired to restore The King in 2008 when they saw it for the first time on the big screen.””

I think it gives the film an extra spark of life and an extra edge.”

Bower has been restoring the film since the 1980s, but his team were first inspired to restore The King in 2008 when they saw it for the first time on the big screen.

“I remember watching the film on a small TV set and thinking, ‘Oh my God, I’ve got to make this work’,” he recalls.

This film is one of the most famous and iconic films of all time, so it’s very exciting to be able to do something that’s going to be used on the BBC,” he concludes. “

Bowers says that the film has become a cult favourite in the UK, and he has restored it to its original state at the BBC, where he’s been editing it since 2008.”

“In some ways, The King is a great film because of the way it’s been interpreted, because of its timelessness. “

“And the fact that people are able to look at it, and know that this film is still in their homes. “

“This is something that can be seen in every home, in every family, whether it’s an old movie collection or a new one. “

“We’ve seen it in cinemas around the world, and people are still going to watch it.””

We’ve seen it in cinemas around the world, and people are still going to watch it.”

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